Second response to a complaint that you’ve made untrue statements about someone else/another business

What’s a second response to a complaint that you’ve made untrue statements about someone else/another business

This is the second in our suite of template letters covering the situation where someone has accused you of making one or more untrue statements about them/their business.

In this second template, you’re reaffirming the position that you set out in your first letter.

While the explanations are slightly shorter, your position has not really changed. If your position has in fact changed, e.g. because you have found more about the circumstances than you knew at the time your first letter was sent, you may want to take expert advice on how best to craft this letter, to ensure your ‘defence’ is as compelling as possible, given the particular circumstances in which this statement has been made.

If you’re the business about whom the untrue statements have been made and you intend to complain, you’ll need our separate suite of templates relating to untrue statements.

Whether a statement comes in a written or verbal format, (i.e. it is libellous or slanderous), it falls under the general law of defamation. A defamatory statement is one that causes, or is likely to cause, damage to the reputation of the person/business on that it targets.

The threshold for bringing a court action against someone for defamation is a high one. A complainant essentially has to prove that the statement did or would cause 'serious harm to the reputation’ of the targeted person or business and in the case of a business, this translates to that business evidencing that it’s suffered serious financial loss.